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Hawaii

Home : United States Destinations : Hawaii

Big Island of Hawaii
Calendar of Events
Cruises
Hawaii Visitors & Convention Bureau
History/Timeline
Kauai
Lanai
Maui
Molokai
Oahu
Video Tour

Big Island of Hawaii
This is the largest island in the Pacific with 4,038 square miles of tropical rainforests, volcanoes, mountains and waterfalls. The Big Island is also the least populated of the islands with only 30 people per square mile. One of the wettest spots on earth is right here, too. Hilo gets 138 inches of rainfall annually. The southernmost point of the United States can be marked at Ka Lae. Near the north end of the island is the Keck, the world’s largest telescope, atop Mauna Kea. Acres of petroglyphs embedded in the black lava, ancient temples, sacred shrines and burial caves tell the history of the island which is rich in tradition and spirituality for those who make their home here. Where else on earth can you experience snowy winter and sultry summer, catch a record blue marlin, surf the best waves and see paradise all within fifty miles?

Calendar of Events
Recommended events organized by month.

Cruises
Find cruise, ship, and itinerary information for Hawaiian cruises for all the major cruise lines on eTravelplan’s cruise connection.

Hawaii Visitors & Convention Bureau
Information Feedback Rank: 2
The convention and visitors bureau has information on all the islands.

History/Timeline
View our timeline of the history of Hawaii.

Kauai
Kauai, or the Garden Island, is the oldest Hawaiian island, and has been enriched by years of erosion. The landscape of Kauai is stunning, and its variable regions and their terrains are equally dramatic. Kauai is where desert, rain forest, beach, valley and cliff coexist. The island is just 24 miles wide at its widest point.

Lanai
According to legend, Lanai was once overrun by evil spirits. It wasn’t until the banished nephew of one of Maui’s chiefs drove out the demons that Hawaiians were able to settle the island. The rich fishing ground and taro farmland didn’t go unnoticed by European explorers, although their early attempts to grow sugar were failures. An effort to establish a Mormon colony in the mid 1800s was also unsuccessful. Lanai was mostly used for grazing land until 1922, when Jim Dole purchased the island to grow pineapples. Today, the majority of Lanai’s population works for the Dole Company, which is now owned by Castle & Cooke. There are no stoplights, only 30 miles of paved roads, no malls, and no fast food establishments on Lanai, making this island something other than the typical vacation spot.

Maui
As the locals say, Maui is “no ka o’i” or “the best!” A long-time favorite of travelers to the sub-tropics, this island has been enjoying a surge of popularity in recent years. Maui is an island that combines small-town friendliness with many opportunities for relaxation and enjoyment, from watching a glorious sunrise over the summit of Haleakala to hiking through the rainforests, soaking up the rays on white and red sand beaches, or enjoying great golf, lavish hotels and whale-watching. Maui offers some of the best sunset views in the islands, and is the only place in Hawaii from which more than three of the other Hawaiian Islands are visible. After dark, Maui provides numerous options for entertainment and dining. Restaurants, clubs and showrooms come alive with the finest in Pacific Rim cuisine, Polynesian entertainment and Hawaiian music.

Molokai
Molokai is an island of history and legend. It was created by volcanic eruptions more than one million years ago. Thousands of people called the 38-mile-long island home before Europeans arrived. The population drastically dipped until one city, Kalaupapa, was designated the place of exile for lepers in the mid-late 1800s. With help from Catholic priest Joseph de Veuster, those with the disease created their own village in the isolated area. By 1950, scientists were able to contain and virtually eliminate leprosy. Many people who battled the disease decided to live out their lives in the tiny village they built. Today, Molokai remains free of commercialization, high rises, fast food and freeways. Living is done simply here, and those who live here prefer it that way.

Oahu
Oahu is the main point of entry for Hawaii, and home to over 75% of the Hawaiian population. It has maintained importance as a naval base, and was made famous when the Japanese bombing of Pearl Harbor occurred here on December 7, 1941. While it is more crowded than the nearby islands, Oahu is still home to some beautiful beaches and luxury resorts, and is a great place to visit.

Video Tour



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